Abstract art

WORKSHOP
September, 11, 12, 13,  2020


COMPOSITION & PRINCIPLES of ABSTRACT ART


IT IS SAID THAT Abstract Painting is painting something that doesn’t exist, an impossible task? maybe, but certainly a very interesting one.

When looking at abstract art, and painting it a good place to start is with looking at identifying these elements:


Counter movement

Variations on a theme

Repetition and surprise

Sensual impact

Rythym and structural integrity

Joining of pieces together

The whole painting is the experience, not just one section. Marks all exist in themselves, but with an energy, movement, or feeling that unifies them.

THE 8 PRINCIPLES of ABSTRACT ART


When painting abstract art these are the principles I consider and include:

1. Balance

2. Emphasis

3. Rhythm/pattern

4. Unity

5. Variety

6. Contrast

7. Movement

8. Surprise, individual voice, or soul


RATIONALE

Abstract art has been around for over 100 years now.

It can be what you want it to be.

There are rules and no rules.

Art is partly idea, partly looking - being very visually alert.

Instinct for making marks guided by experience of making marks - what works, what doesn’t.


COLOUR Abstract art is is marked from the movements that prdated it in that the use of colour can be seen as bing liberated from form.


Things changed when colour pigments were developed by chemists and the progress of science of colour and understanding of how we see colour. In 1855 colour scientists discovered that by placing colours side by side with their opposites, will cause an increase in vibrancy.

This was around the same time as electric light and lots of social changes came about. A potent mix.

SOME OF MY FAVOUITE ABSTRACT ARTISTS


HILMA AF KLINT, a woman who is identified by many as the first abstract artist, she produced 23, 000 pages of sketches and notes, with a ‘Theosphical’ basis, in which her paintings, colours and shapes symbolise soul’s journey


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PAUL KLEE (early c20)

When I was a child a print of a painting by Paul Klee hung in my parents bed room. Today it hangs in my hall. Klee observes nature, and uses thought and logic to use tonally graded colour to alter colour by the use of light and dark. Interest in how one thing affects another. Everything is perception. Everthing is related.

His art was part of his philosophy- we each organise our own perception of reality.

There is no right way.

What’s really seen when anyone sees anything?



Paul Klee (Met Museum)


ALBERT IRVIN OBE, RA (d 2015)

Follows Klee and Rothko

Colours used primarily in relation to each other.

Painting is a language, brush marks are the verbs.



Albert Irvin (Jill George Gallery)








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© Helen Elliott